Q&A with Graham H Miller – the business of crime

Q&A with Graham H Miller – the business of crime

Every week we feature a Q&A session with one of our Crime Cymru authors. This week, Graham H Miller gives us a unique insight into the business side of writing. Give us a brief introduction to you. I’m Graham H Miller and I’ve been writing literally as long as I can remember. As a teenager (a long time ago now) I played proper, paper and dice, role playing games and had a couple of scenarios published in national magazines. Then at university I graduated from that to writing novels. There was a moment where I realised that I could write a book and that was it – I was off! What’s your connection to Wales? My connection to Wales is my lovely wife, Ellie. We met at the University of Kent in Canterbury and then lived in Kent for the next twenty or so years. But I wanted to escape the South East and she wanted to come home so we’ve been here...
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Q&A with Nigel C Williams – robins, ghosts and guitars

Q&A with Nigel C Williams – robins, ghosts and guitars

Every week we feature a Q&A session with one of our Crime Cymru authors. This week, Nigel C Williams talks about his writing life and the embarrassing moment that gave birth to his middle initial. Give us a brief introduction to you. I'm rapidly approaching my 60th birthday in November and live in Ystradgynlais in the Swansea valley.  I was born in Abercrave in the shadow of the Sleeping Giant and spent my innocent formative years exploring the mountains with school friends. Have you ever had an embarrassing moment/incident? What happened? I had to add the initial C in my name because I was born into a family where things were hard and my parents couldn't afford a middle name for me (I chose the initial 'C' because it's my wife's name - Caroline). I realised I needed the extra initial when I was invited to Coventry Library to talk about my books. When I arrived, I was taken into a room where...
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Q&A with GB Williams – from Locked Up to lockdown

Q&A with GB Williams – from Locked Up to lockdown

Every week we feature a Q&A session with one of our Crime Cymru authors. This week, GB Williams describes her writing process and talks about how she copes with keeping up with ideas. Give us a brief introduction to you. I’m GB Williams. I write contemporary crime. I’ve originally from Kent, however, I’ve lived in Wales for nearly 30 years now. I work full time (not as a writer), I’m married, two children and seem to be rather bossed about by the world’s most imperious cat. Do you read other novels while you're working? If so, what is your preferred genre? Oh yes! I have in the last couple of years I’ve really got into listening to audible. The thing is, I spend my days staring at computer screens, and then when I’m writing it’s usually directly on the laptop, so my eyes get very tired. This means that of late I’ve mostly listened to books, which really works for me, when not in...
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Q&A with Katherine Stansfield – from falling creatures to mermaid’s call

Q&A with Katherine Stansfield – from falling creatures to mermaid’s call

Every week we feature a Q&A session with one of our Crime Cymru authors. This week, Katherine Stansfield talks of her journey between Cornwall and Wales and gives us a fascinating insight into her writing process. Give us a brief introduction to you: I’m a multi-genre writer who likes to work in different forms. I write historical crime fiction, fantasy crime (under the co-writing pseudonym D. K. Fields), and I’m a poet. I live in Cardiff and teach for a number of universities, plus I’m a mentor for Literature Wales. What’s your connection to Wales? I’m from Cornwall originally and moved to Wales to go to university in Aberystwyth, on the coast of west Wales, almost 20 years ago. I fell in love with the place, and with being a student, and stayed there to do an MA and PhD, and then taught in the English department for a few years. After a year travelling, I moved to Cardiff with my partner David Towsey...
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Q&A with Alison Layland – a passion for language

Q&A with Alison Layland – a passion for language

Every week we feature a Q&A session with one of our Crime Cymru authors. This week, Alison Layland talks of her passions of language, literature and the environment and how they inform her writing. What’s your connection to Wales? Although I’m originally a Yorkshire lass – I grew up in Shipley and Bradford, West Yorkshire – I moved to Wales with my family in 1997. As a linguist, I was delighted to find our village was Welsh-speaking and I immediately started learning Welsh. It was thanks to this that I started writing, as when our language course finished, a group of us continued in the form of creative writing classes. Writing in a language that isn’t my mother tongue somehow silenced the inner critic and opened the doors for me, and I started writing short stories and flash fiction. After winning the Welsh Learner of the Year competition at the National Eisteddfod in 1999, I became a member of the Gorsedd of...
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Q&A with Sally Spedding – secrets, ghosts and vicars with guns

Q&A with Sally Spedding – secrets, ghosts and vicars with guns

Every week we feature a Q&A session with one of our Crime Cymru authors. This week, Sally Spedding talks of her fascinating childhood and her journey as a writer.  What’s your connection to Wales? My twin brother and I were born in Porthcawl. (He still reminds me, I was ‘just a shadow’ before weighing in at barely 3 lbs!) My Mum was from Neath where her father was the Mayor, and his mother had kept horses in Pembrokeshire. Our house, named ‘Meppel’ after the town in Holland from where Dad’s parents fled before the Occupation, was on the edge of Trecco Bay’s sand dunes. It was idyllic, but shadows still lurked… His psychic mother (our Oma) had sensed tragedy looming, and they’d fled to Penarth where their German surname soon proved dangerous. They moved to ‘Coed y Twyn’ a house high up on the Blorenge mountain near Abergavenny, but no safety there either, while the nearby vicar kept a rifle under his...
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Q&A with John Nicholl – when the genre chooses you

Q&A with John Nicholl – when the genre chooses you

Every week we feature a Q&A session with one of our Crime Cymru authors. This week, John Nicholl talks of how his experiences as a police officer and social worker have influenced his writing. What’s your connection to Wales?  I was born and grew up in the pleasant west Wales market town of Carmarthen, on the River Towy. I spent several years in the West Country as a young man, firstly in Devon and then Cornwall, but the lure of Wales soon drew me back home. I now live on the coast about eight miles from where I was born. Have you ever had an embarrassing moment/incident? What happened?  When I self-published my first book, I sent an early draft for publication rather than the proofread manuscript. I only discovered my error when several reviewers commented in no uncertain terms. After two years of work, I really thought I’d blown it. But, as embarrassing as it undoubtedly was, the situation was soon resolved, and...
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Q&A with Jan Newton – euphoniums, horses and dream locations

Q&A with Jan Newton – euphoniums, horses and dream locations

Every week we feature a Q&A session with one of our Crime Cymru authors. This week, Jan Newton talks of her love of the country and how it influences her writing. A Brief Introduction  I spent my first eleven years in Manchester, where I developed a distinctive accent and sense of humour. Along with my sister, I also developed a huge love of horses, which came from our Dad. We were lucky enough to move to a smallholding in Mellor, a small village between Marple in Cheshire, and New Mills in Derbyshire, and to increase our horse and pony collection to four. I spent every spare moment on the back of a pony, exploring the hills and moorlands, and used to get into terrible trouble for climbing out of the bedroom window armed only with a piece of baler twine, to go and ride before school. The baler twine made a makeshift bridle. Not quite as good as the real thing for...
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Q&A with Philip Gwynne Jones – Life in Venice

Q&A with Philip Gwynne Jones – Life in Venice

Every week we feature a Q&A session with one of our Crime Cymru authors. This week, Philip Gwynne Jones talks of his love of Venice and the passions that influence his writing. Give us a brief introduction to you. Hi, I’m Philip Gwynne Jones, and I’m the author of the Nathan Sutherland series which is set in Venice, the city where I’ve lived for the past eight years. Venetian Gothic, the most recent in the series, has just been published. When I started writing, I decided to use my middle name as there are a few other Philip Joneses in the media – and then, of course, I discovered Philip Gwyn Jones (note the spelling) the editor of The Bookseller magazine. We’ve been known to get messages meant for the other. What’s your connection to Wales? I was born in Swansea and grew up in South Wales. My dad worked for the old Midland Bank so we used to move around a lot...
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Q & A with Phil Rowlands

Today's question and answer session is with author Phil Rowlands. Give us a brief introduction to you. I’m originally from Haverfordwest in Pembrokeshire but now live in Penarth. My widowed mum wanted me to have a proper job with good prospects. I tried but the junior civil engineer career I managed to talk myself into didn’t last. I quite liked the travelling life, the laughs and the banter but it wasn’t as fulfilling as I had hoped. So, after a variety of jobs, I eventually got into drama school and after three years became a professional actor. I wasn’t the best or the worst and for a long time I loved it, especially the social side, and was quite successful but then I became caught in a TV villain/ policeman axis and decided to try writing scripts to see if I could do it. It was as hard as the performing but it worked and, more to the point, I got well...
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